Seeking Employment -resumes of MT’s looking to change careers

Update: Nov 14th, 2012

By popular demand I developed this page specifically for resumes of current medical transcriptionists seeking employment outside the field.  It seems that medical transcriptionists are being steadily replaced by computer software that produces what some would consider a reasonable facsimile of our work and even those with decades at the same job now face the prospect of searching for work opportunities.  Our comment section is a good example of this trend.

 

Many of the commenters wonder what type of employment a long-time medical transcription is suited for.   I believe that an experienced medical transcriptionist is an excellent choice for a variety of jobs both in the medical field and outside.  Below are some of the traits a typical medical transcriptionist can offer a prospective employer.

 

There are several characteristics that I’ve had to develop in my medical transcription career.  The first is organization and attention to detail.  I get dozens of files from several different doctors, which come in periodically throughout the day.  Each file must be transcribed to report format, numbered and placed in the appropriate doctor’s folder.  A small lapse in my organizational system could lead to a file being missed or even putting a completed report into the wrong doctor’s folder.

 

I’ve also become very mindful of deadlines, prioritizing and autonomy.  A doctor might dictate three times the amount of files that he normally does but he still expects the finished reports by morning.  In my home office there’s no one but me to ensure that I deliver the highest quality work by the expected deadline.

 

I’m also a pretty skilled editor and researcher.  Physicians tend to dictate a  perpetual list without any type of punctuation or connecting words.  Some go out of their way to spell a certain medication, disease or the name of a referring physician but very frequently spell it incorrectly.  I’m expected to turn in a final  product free of grammatical and spelling errors.

 

Before I ever started in the medical transcription field I received extensive training that included courses on proper grammar and punctuation as well as specific medical courses such as human anatomy, medical terminology and pharmacology.  I was also trained in keyboarding and various computer software.

 

Please submit resumes through comments or by email to lori@transcriptionology.com

 

 

 

  1. Shahbazkasu
    Jul 29th, 2012 at 20:47
    Quote | #1

    I’ve been looking clferualy at an online school out of Texas called Med Line. I’ve watched it’s skill building coursework postings increase in number, and I’ve emailed them and called, at one point, to nail them down in order to decide if their coursework will help me again be employable as an MT (I was trained in my twenties and worked for a local hospital in radiology transcription). More recently, I’ve done some local research to find out where the MT jobs are. I live in the San Francisco bay area and I found only one hospital that currently uses an on-site transcription pool. The balance of the hospitals I contacted (approximately 16 hospitals, including the one I worked for 30 years ago), now outsource their transcription duties to bureaus . Needless to say, I’ve had an impossible time obtaining any information regarding pay scales, benefits, etc. from bureaus. I’ve been unable to obtain any data from these businesses.So, I went to back Med Line and asked the down-and-dirty questions I needed answered. Med Line, as it turns out, offers qualified students an internship with an affiliated bureau. Apparently, payment is based on per-line production, so typing-editing speed counts.The cost of Med Line school is significant. However, they offer payment plans. I will be attending their new student orientation Webinar on October 30, and I’m hoping I’ll come away with enough clarity (via satisfactory answers to subsequent questions) to sign on.I thoroughtly enjoyed doing MT work (I was paid hourly). I have the chops however, at this point in my life, I just don’t want any surprises. I’ll post again after the webinar. Thanks!! JG

  2. Deirdre
    Nov 4th, 2012 at 18:51
    Quote | #2

    I have 20+ years of medical transcription experience with a variety of specialties. I live in a very rural area so I need to work from home. I would be interested in any type of transcription work – medical, research, focus groups, legal, forensic.

    I can be reached through transcriptionology.com – ID# 2727574

  3. heads up
    Nov 6th, 2012 at 15:38
    Quote | #3

    ups is hiring right now

  4. afolks
    Nov 7th, 2012 at 10:41
    Quote | #4

    Anita Folks (contact through transcriptionology.com). Recently laid off from hospital transcription staff and looking for in-house transcription position or clerical in medical office.

  5. jennifer
    Nov 7th, 2012 at 11:24
    Quote | #5

    My name is Jennifer Bowers. I’ve been a medical transcriptionist for 15 years and have seen my pay rate decline steadily. I’m avaiable for any type of data entry project and can be reached through Transcriptionology.com

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